J. D. Schall; from clean design to narration

Artist Profile by Suzanne Adams, Editor

On a mid-November day I walked into a remarkable artist’s life, J. D. Schall. Creative studio and artistic home were shown to me, the fortunate blogger, by one of Louisville’s premier potters.

J. D. had just returned from a trip to Mexico and observed that; “Mexicans have symbols from their culture that have been given to them and used for centuries. I’m currently pursuing symbols that have meaning in our culture.” J. D. has spent the previous two years developing work that incorporates his unique interpretations of symbols, such as fleeing rabbits, onto his boldly formed functional works.

Plates-and-Bowl

Rabbit-Bowls

How did Schall get to this point in his career? In telling his story, J. D. revealed that his creative processes coincided with his choices of place and work. As a college student at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, he majored in English literature and minored in anthropology and religious studies. Imagine seeking knowledge from great minds and times while living in the rolling, isolated landscape of mid-Wisconsin. In his last semester, 1994, J. D. took a ceramics course and continued to make ceramics for three years thereafter; trading ceramic classes for job hours worked.

In 1997, J. D. moved to Baton Rouge, LA and formed Studio 801, a 15-member artists’ cooperative. He also became the head potter for Burts Cason Inc., a pottery design firm specializing in interior design. It was in Baton Rouge that J. D. began throwing large pots, sometimes handling 18 pounds on the wheel. His palette changed from the browns of Wisconsin to the intense colors of southern Louisiana. He learned the ceramics trade while working alongside American merchandisers and ceramic painters from Vietnam.

In 2002 J. D. moved to Louisville and founded Schall Studio and Design. At this point he began to specialize in clean modern design, influenced by 1950’s modernism and the Arts and Crafts movement. Ancient Asian and Greek ceramic influences are also present in his work. J. D. has been successful in building his career through representation at numerous wholesale and retail ceramic shows. He currently sells in galleries and interior design firms nationwide and takes private commissions.

Schall-Design
midnightyellow150
In 2009 Schall had a very impressive exhibition in which he showed large pieces which displayed his love of color, painted surface treatments, and the use of tarnished gold and silver leaf. Simply beautiful.

J. D. describes himself as a builder on the wheel. In his modern design series we see that this process suits the creation of works that confidently handle daily aspects of living, such as dining, gardening, lighting, bird watching. As a builder, Schall pays close attention to each component of each form: base/foot; body; and lip/rim. As a designer he delivers his art through sprayed and brushed color. By placing one deliriously exciting color next to another, often on a bold pottery rim, J. D. brings life and meaning to the sculptural pottery form.

During the past two years Schall has been developing another way to bring meaning to form. He is currently creating expressive narrative symbols and stories derived from nature and fables, such as birds, leaves and flowers, The Tortoise and The Hare and The Three Blind Mice.

We can glimpse the reasoning behind the symbols in Schall’s painting of the Three Blind Mice by viewing a vintage card in his studio where the mice are in danger of loosing their tails. J. D.’s mice have tails intact and are sporting halos.

Blind-Mice-CardThree-Blind-Mice
J. D. uses fine brushes and slip-trailing to create gestural marks with black and white slips and underglazes. He draws free-hand on fired clay or he uses tracing paper to repeat images, often dancing around clay forms.

It’s a pleasure to witness an artist as he uses seminal experiences from his past (college studies, wheel building, Asian painting techniques, cultural symbols) to structure a new process for his current works. J. D. explains his motivation: “Just as I have to justify selling modern design by pushing my works beyond the ordinary, I have to work out the reason behind my symbols.”

JD-Shadows

J. D. Schall’s work is for sale on Thanksgiving weekend, Nov. 23 and 24, at the Pigment Gallery, Mellwood Art Center.  He is represented at AA Clay Studio and Gallery in Louisville. He is also participating in the $20.00 sale at Copper and Kings on December 8th.

LEO’s Latest Podcast Reveals AA Clay’s Mission

Ceramicist Suzanne Adams and AA Clay Studio & Gallery owner Alex Adams talked with contributing arts editor Jo Anne Triplett about their new blog and newly introduced online ceramics gallery.
LEO-Podcast-Logo
Podcast #68: released on September 28 found at LEOweekly.com
This podcast will remain in LEO archives.

In this interesting talk Alex Adams describes the mission and highlights of AA Clay: aaclay.com. “Our mission is to create a community studio with access to ceramic equipment and working space for the pursuit of ceramics.”

One highlight worth noting is the Online Gallery, recently added to sales gallery which features local artists’ work.

Suzanne Adams describes the mission and highlights of AAClay’s new bi-monthly blog: clayelements.blog. “The blog’s mission is to magnify our ceramic culture in Louisville and southern Indiana.

Our new blog directs the readers’ attention across interests such as history, technique, and all things ceramics.

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The obligatory selfie taken at the LEO offices.
We enjoyed our interview with Jo Anne Triplett at LEO Weekly and appreciate LEO’s support of the arts.

AA Clay Joins The Ages by Making a Ceramic Mosaic

Ancient Greek mosaics are believed to be the earliest form of the mosaic technique. Greek methods began with the use of pebbles to form designs, binding the pebbles with compacted earth or a mixture of sand and lime. Artifacts, where pebbles were used to make patterned floors and pavements, have been found from the 8th century BCE.

Ancient-Mosaic
Mosaic-Octopus

Pebble mosaics persisted until approximately the 3rd century BCE, when they began to be replaced with mosaics of cut stone, glass, and ceramic cubes, or tesserae, which were adhered with mortar.

Tessera, (Latin: “cube,” or “die”) plural Tesserae, in mosaic work, a small piece of stone, glass, ceramic, or other hard material cut in a cubical or some other regular shape. (Britannica, 2018)

Ancient-Greek-Mosaic
Ancient Greek mosaic showing tessera pattern.

Mosaic art became the leading form of pictorial art, culminating in the extraordinary Byzantine period. The Renaissance movement, c. 1400, initiated the painted fresco technique through which artists were able to produce more realistic representations.

Hagia-Sophia
Mosaic dome of the Hagia Sophia 450 BCE

Use of the tesserae technique has ebbed and flowed over the centuries and has led to a wider skill set of varying techniques used by contemporary artists.

 

Enter AA Clay Studio and Gallery.

The Process:

Begin-breaking-tiles

Step One: Collect ceramic pieces.

 

Mosic-2

Step Two: Layout design on cement board.

 

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Step Three: Apply pieces with mastic adhesive.

 

 

Step Four: Apply colored grout to each panel.

 

Mosaic-Installed

Step Five: Installed Ceramic Mosaic.

 

Still interested in mosaics?
Check out contemporary mosaic street art below.

The city of Prague, Checkoslovakia funds artists to enliven outdoor culture through ceramic mosaics.

Face-Mosaic

Space Invader, influenced by popular arcade videos of the 70’s and 80’s, creates “invasion waves” in cities where he and his crew install 30-40 mosaics in various street locations. His goal is to bring art outside museum walls.

Space-Mosaic

Space-Invader

Jim Bachor uses contemporary subjects of pop imagery, like Starbucks and Twinkies, to fill potholes. He mixes cut glass tesserae with the gritty asphalt of Chicago streets. His art strangely refers back to ancient street pavements. Who would have thought?

Pothole

AA Clay members are proud to be a part of the long history of mosaic art making. We offer our outdoor mosaic wall art to all who are a part of our ceramic and neighborhood communities.

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The completed AAClay members Ceramic Mosaic, August, 2018

Suggested reading can be found at the Ceramic Arts Network site under free downloads, bottom of page two: https://ceramicartsnetwork.org/freebies/free-guides/page/2/

Marie-Elena Ottman, Ceramic Sculpture

Artist Talk Hosted by Louisville Clay at AA Clay Studio & Gallery September 11, 2018

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Louisville Clay members gathered at AA Clay for Artist Talk and Potluck
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President of Louisville Clay, Alex Adams introduces Marie-Elena Ottman

Marie-Elena Ottman is a Louisville based artist with a story worth telling. Louisville Clay members enjoyed seeing images of Marie-Elena’s fantastical ceramic art, while hearing her compelling personal story.

Iguana

Having grown up in Panama with an American father and Panamanian mother, Marie-Elena makes art about the symbiosis and the tension that can exist between two cultures. At age 21 she broke with tradition in Panama, where women stay at home until married, by emigrating to the United States to attend college in Montana. What followed was an art journey in which she has represented the integration of two cultures through visual metaphor.

Portrait-slide-Panama

Marie-Elena’s ceramic process is achieved through coil building and the use of extraordinary color. She also artfully combines glass with ceramics in her sculpture.

Her current images are derived from her homeland and include coconuts, cashews, iguanas, monkeys, coatimundis, exotic birds,Panamanian dress and vibrant color. The following images are metaphors about pregnancy, split personality, and greediness, among other life stories.

 

“I’ve learned to not forget culture, to embrace the past while also moving forward” said Marie-Elena as she closed her presentation. Ottman currently teaches Intro to Ceramics and Advanced Handbuilding at the University of Louisville. She and her husband have two children, ages 12 and 10, who are learning about their heritage by speaking Spanish as well as English.

Marie-art

AA Clay Studio and Gallery: Members Show

AA Clay is Louisville’s original open-studio for ceramic artists. We proudly present seven of our member artists in an exhibition and sale that is open to the public. Closing Reception: Join us Saturday, May 19, 6 – 8 pm.  Celebrate the work of our artists. Refreshments will be served. The following pieces are available for … Continue reading “AA Clay Studio and Gallery: Members’ Show”

AA Clay is Louisville’s original open-studio for ceramic artists. We proudly present seven of our member artists in an exhibition and sale that is open to the public.

Closing Reception: Join us Saturday, May 19, 6 – 8 pm.  Celebrate the work of our artists. Refreshments will be served. The following pieces are available for purchase during the Members’ Show:

Work of studio member Sara Keiper

 

Work of studio member Lynn Duke

 

Work of studio member Peri Crush

 

Work of studio member Beth Bradley

 

Work of studio member Sharon Ramick

 

Work of studio Director Alex Adams

 

Work of studio member Caitlin McGlade

 

 

Members-Show-Postcard-blog
Members’ Show postcard announcement.


AA Clay Studio and Gallery
is a community of artists from Louisville and southern Indiana. We support each other through networking, advising, and encouraging.

Please shop our gallery during open hours:

Tuesday           10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Wednesday       4 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Thursday         10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Saturday          12 p.m. – 6 p.m.
Sunday.            12 p.m. – 4 p.m.

We are currently building an online gallery. Connect to our gallery at aaclay.com.

Clay – Why Do We Love It?


Clay
blankets our earth’s surface with tiny particles of weathered granite.

Wet clay is strong and malleable. Dry clay holds its shape and can be hardened through heating to extreme temperatures.

“If one takes any finely grained non-clay mineral and mixes it with water, a crumbly mass will be produced with almost zero formability. If the same is done with clay, however, there is produced a mass that is readily formed into any desired shape and, most interesting of all, it will retain that shape under the force of gravity. In other words, the clay mass has three unique properties; first, it may be deformed without cracking; second, when the deforming force ceases, the shape will remain fixed; and further, when the clay mass is dried, it has considerable strength.”

Studio Potter, Volume 4, Number 2 (Winter 1975/76)

Clay has strength because many extremely fine particles can be tightly packed in a clay body.

It’s plastic because its molecules are shaped like dinner plates, with an average diameter of one micron (one millionth of a meter). When wet, the ‘plates’ slide against each other due to thin sheets of water between them. The presence of water allows clay particles to move against each other and change the clay form without breaking.

Pull, pinch, slice, carve, stick, roll, press, twist, and squash!
We can form almost anything out of clay.

A clay object can be hardened through firing at high temperatures, such as 2400 degrees Fahrenheit. It can be coated with specific clays (glazes) and fired again to make an object that is impervious to water.

Once high-fired, a clay object can never disintegrate into its original molecular structure. This is when we call it ceramic.

As early as 24000 BCE people were making figurines for ceremonial purposes. Functional pottery flourished when agriculture became prevalent around 10,000 BCE.

Venus of Dolni Vestonice                        Ancient Mesopotamia pottery
(26,000 – 24,000 BCE)

Wallace and Gromit is a British clay animation comedy series created by Nick Park of Aardman Animations. circa 1990.

Learning is Play.

It was our pleasure, yesterday,  at AA Clay Studio & Gallery to invite 15 “beginners” to the studio to reacquaint themselves with the joy of clay. Two major techniques were taught – wheel throwing and hand building.

Each “student” did a fine job grasping the basics. And, to the basics these enthusiastic folks added that important ingredient – PLAY.

Let the following pictures tell the story.

Alex-leads-class
Alex introduces the group.
Alex demonstrates wheel throwing.

 

Suzanne demonstrates hand building techniques.


Participants were from Level Up, a local business that organizes classes taught at various arts, food, wellness, lifestyle, and business locations.